The Our Father In Aramaic

by Jimmy Akin

in Languages

Yesterday there was a caller on the show who wanted to know about finding the Our Father in Aramaic. I mentioned that it’s found in the Pshitta, an Aramaic translation of Scripture, and it’s also available online. Unfortunately, the address of the site I had was too long, so I promised to put it up on the blog this morning.

Unfortunately, after the show, a closer inspection of the site showed it to be kooky to the extreme. The translation they gave of the Aramaic into English was completely wrong, so I decided just to print the text of the Lord’s Prayer in Aramaic.

First, though, here’s an audio file of it (.wav format):

LISTEN.

After doing a little digging around, I found the following nice image, which contains the prayer in English and the Aramaic alphabet, with an Aramaic pronounciation also. Bear in mind that the English and the Aramaic pronunciation runs left-to-right, while the Aramaic script itself runs right-to-left.

Also bear in mind that the pronunciation the prayer is given in Aramaic will vary from one group of speakers to another, based on accent. For example, the first word of the Lord’s prayer in Aramaic is Abun, which will be pronounced by some groups as "Ah-boon," others as "Ah-woon," and still others (as in the transliteration below) as "Ah-voon."

Click to enlarge.
Abundbashmaya2

One word of warning about the above: What’s on the Aramaic transliteration line doesn’t always match up to exactly what’s on the English line. Because of word division and length, the lines don’t match up exactly. For example, on the third line from the bottom in the Aramaic column, you’ll see the word Malkutha ("Mal-koo-tha"), which means "Kingdom," but Kingdom is on the fourth line from the bottom in the English column.

I can’t go through the whole prayer line by line right now, but some folks might find it interesting to understand a little of how the language works.

The prayer is often called the Abun Dbashmaya in Aramaic, which are its first two words. This is similar to the way we call it the Our Father after it’s first two words. But in Aramaic "Abun Dbashmaya" means more than just "Our Father."

The "Our Father" part of it is just the first word: Abun. As you know, one of the Aramaic words for "father" (there are actually several variants) is Abba, which is just spelled ABA in Aramaic (it being understood that the B reduplicates in pronunciation).

In Aramaic, pronouns often take the form of suffixes on the ends of words, and the suffix -un is a pronoun suffix that means "our." When you stick -un on Abba, you get "Abun," meaning "Our Father."

The Aramaic word for "heaven" is shmaya, and you can see that in the second word of the prayer. The prefix b- (sometimes followed by a vowel, sometimes not) is the Aramaic equivalent of "in" (remember the in/on discussion we had recently?), so bashmaya means "in heaven." And the prefix d- is the Aramaic equivalent of "who," "which," or "that." Dbashmaya thus means "who (is) in heaven." (Aramaic sometimes omits the verb "to be," as it does here.)

Thus you can see how "Abun dbashmaya" translates as "Our Father, who art in heaven."

Cool, huh?

PlayPlay

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{ 52 comments }

Tarhiel February 9, 2007 at 2:04 am

Yeah, cool, I didn´t know, Jimmy, taht you are so skilled in languages. It must took long time to learn them. I know only english and spanish (apart from my natal laguage), and both of them took me quite long time to understand + regular exercising.

JW February 9, 2007 at 3:16 am

Thanks.

AnnonyMouse February 9, 2007 at 5:08 am

Jimmy,
Does the Aramaic read right to left; bottom to top?
The reason I ask is this, I know Arabic reads right to left; bottom to top but they may be something that Mohammed changed.
Just wondering.

skyhawk February 9, 2007 at 7:11 am

“Bear in mind that the English and the Aramaic pronunciation runs left-to-right, while the Aramaic script itself runs right-to-left.”

AnnonyMouse February 9, 2007 at 7:14 am

Skyhawk,
I just reread it and see I missed it. Thank you.
What a dumb moment.

RobW February 9, 2007 at 7:54 am

Here’s something people might find interesting: The Lord’s Prayer in Aramaic set to Music:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=MAEIrp4MFBE

Pseudomodo February 9, 2007 at 7:59 am

Exactly what texts have the “for thine is the kingdom…”
As far as I’m aware it is only in the Didache and not in the Gospels at least in the RSV.
I thought that the medeival texts had this as a gloss in the margin that eventually made it’s way into the Gospels. So….. how does it turn up on an aramaic version?? or is this simply an aramaic version of the Didache??

Noe February 9, 2007 at 8:54 am

Pseudomodo, the image is probably from a protestant site. There are protestant speakers of Aramaic. Ergo …
Too bad about two things:
(1) Many of the pronunciations on the WAV file seem to disagree quite a bit with the transliteration in the graphic image.
(2) The transliteration is not helpful enough, because it does not show accentuation (via upper-case syllables), and it does not use any phonetic device to indicate how a vowel (e.g., “a”) is to be pronounced (e.g., as in “bay,” as in “bad,” as in “bah,” etc.)

The Waffling Anglican February 9, 2007 at 10:10 am

Anyone wishing an Aramaic Our Father or Ave should probably just go to their local Maronite parish or, if there’s not one close, find one on the web and email the Abuna (Father). (Western) Aramaic is the Maronite liturgical language and is used for the Trisagion, the Consecration, and certain other parts of the Mass.

pseudomodo February 9, 2007 at 11:15 am

Thanks guys (or girls)
Still… as well as having to defend the “fact” that the catholic bible has way too many books :) we also have to defend the Catholic version of the Our Father as having way too few words.
I just tell catechumens that the Catholic version of the Our father is the same as the Gospels and that we add the epilogue later after the priests words as a liturgical conclusion or an eccliesial addition in the same way that the Didache taught us to pray the Our Father.
The Didache tells us how we as a Church can pray the Our Father. And it actually recommends praying it 3 times each day.
Does this make sense?

Puzzled February 9, 2007 at 11:47 am

This attempt to go back to the (presumed) Aramaic behind the Greek originals ignores several facts.
1) The Jews, and the Galileans in particular were bilingual in Greek and Aramaic. Sort of like recent immigrant Hispanics in the US. They might speak Spanish as well as English at home, but English in the work-a-day world.
2) The Holy Spirit inspired, verbally, the apostles and their amanuenses to write the didaskalia in Greek. That -is- the divine original, not the hypothesized Aramaic which may or may not have been spoken.
Thus, to go to a hypothesized verbal Aramaic original in order to try to prove some theological point is severely flawed for historical and theological reasons.
The Pesshita is a translation from the Greek into the Syriac dialect of Aramaic, not an intact Palestinian Aramaic text.
Even Matthew haLevi wrote in Greek, in spite of claims to the contrary due to the more Jewish characteristics of the Gospel. There’s that section of a codex of Matthew that had to have been written between 12-17 years of the Passion to demonstrate that. It is the same as the koine text that we have today.
Most Jews in fact, used the LXX for their Scriptures, rather than the Hebrew original, Hebrew having become a scholar’s language several hundred years earlier during the Babylonian Captivity.

Anonymous February 9, 2007 at 12:01 pm

I don’t think Jimmy is trying to use the Aramaic translation to prove any theological point. He’s just posting it because it’s kind of neat.
Or dope, or uber-leet, or whatever.

Tim J. February 9, 2007 at 12:32 pm

Sorry, that was me.

Esau February 9, 2007 at 12:43 pm

Most Jews in fact, used the LXX for their Scriptures, rather than the Hebrew original…
Puzzled:
If the Jews used the LXX (I’m assuming you mean the Septuagint) for their Scriptures, then why didn’t they accept all its books as Scripture (such as the ones the Catholic Church accepted from the Septuagint)?
I’m not disputing what you just mentioned; only wondering if you might happen to know why.
Thanks.

Jason in SA February 9, 2007 at 1:23 pm

“1) . . . Sort of like recent immigrant Hispanics in the US. They might speak Spanish as well as English at home, but English in the work-a-day world.”
A ha. Ahahaahhhahahha. Oh.

Rosemarie February 9, 2007 at 2:24 pm

+J.M.J+
If anyone is interested, here is a transliteration of the Our Father into Hebrew (modern Hebrew, I think):
Avinu shebashamaim, (Our Father who art in heaven)
yitkadesh shimechah. (hallowed be Thy name)
Tavo malchutechah, (Thy kingdom come)
yehi retsonechah (Thy will be done)
ke va’shamaim ken ba’aretz. (on earth as it is in heaven)
Lechem chukeinu ten lanu ha’yom, (Give us this day our daily bread)
uslach lanu al chovoteinu, (and forgive us our trespasses)
kefi salachnu gam anachnu l’cha-yaveinu. (as we forgive those who trespass against us)
Ve’al tvi’enu lidei nisa-yon, (And lead us not into temptation)
ki im chaltzeinu min hara. (But deliver us from evil.)
I find it interesting to compare it to the Aramaic, to see the similarities and differences (even though it’s a modern translation, while the Aramaic is probably more ancient).
BTW, I also have the Hail Mary and a few other Christian prayers in Hebrew, if anyone is interested.
In Jesu et Maria,

MenTaLguY February 9, 2007 at 3:31 pm

Esau: aggressive de-helenization in subsequent centuries AD, basically.
In general one has to be careful in appealing to Jewish tradition, as Christianity is old enough now that it’s possible for a Christian tradition to be older than the corresponding contemporary Jewish one.
Protestants take their canon from the Masoretic texts rather than the LXX partly as a result of a confusion over just such an issue.

Esau February 9, 2007 at 3:57 pm

Esau: aggressive de-helenization in subsequent centuries AD, basically.
Thanks, MenTaLguy!
I knew it had something to do with the fact that the Septuagint was in Greek, not Hebrew; and that, at the time the Jews were deciding their Canon, they had some sort of identity crisis with the destruction of the Temple in 70 AD.
From what I learned way back when, their whole world was centered on the Temple. When that was destroyed, they were dispersed when Titus and the Roman legions destroyed the Temple, and the Jews were really struggling for their identity and there was some sort of backlash against anything Greek (corresponding, of course, to what you just said) and, we could also argue, against anything Christian as well.
But, that’s why I was interested in what Puzzled mentioned.
I don’t quite see, assuming what he said was correct (and, again, I’m not saying that he isn’t), the Jews would actually use the LXX (the Septuagint) for their Scriptures when they had actually rejected the LXX way back when in the first place.
About what you said though:
Protestants take their canon from the Masoretic texts rather than the LXX partly as a result of a confusion over just such an issue.
I agree; for example, if you look in Hebrews 11, there is a place where it talks about how some of the heroes of the Faith have refused to be released and have been killed and martyred in order to obtain a better Resurrection.
You could read the Protestant Old Testament from front to back and you’ll never find that. But, where you will find it is in the Book of 2nd Macabbees (in a Catholic bible), where there is a group of martyrs who are being tortured for adhering to the Jewish Faith and, rather than be released, they stick to their Faith and are martyred so that they can have a better resurrection; and that’s exactly what’s being referred to in the Book of Hebrews!
Also, that’s only one example!
The New Testament writers had actually used the Septuagint tradition as their version for the Old Testament Scriptures.
In fact, I remember a Protestant minister convert telling me that a seminary professor in his Protestant university actually taught this as well.

Maureen February 9, 2007 at 4:18 pm

Actually, what Jesus said was the original. There wasn’t anything hypothetical about it when He said it.

Josh February 9, 2007 at 5:19 pm

Also, for anyone trying to make sense of the script while listening to the prayer, this is in the Estrangela script and does not have vowel pointing – it is only the consonants, which is quite standard for Semitic scripts. This would make it more difficult to make much sense of the script without knowing the words!
And as far as the use of the LXX by the NT authors – I think that is unassailable. If you take Paul’s letters, for instance, and isolate his OT quotes and compare them to the MT, it is obvious that that is not what Paul was quoting. His quotes are often verbatim what we find in the LXX as you’d find it in a modern edition. Sometimes they are not, but this is due to the complicated history of the LXX text, and the quotations that are not exact are cosistently closer to the LXX than the MT.

Esau February 9, 2007 at 5:49 pm

MenTaLguY AND Josh:
Your comments below are EXTREMELY helpful!!!
Thank-ya, brothers!!!!
This is AWESOME material!!!
In general one has to be careful in appealing to Jewish tradition, as Christianity is old enough now that it’s possible for a Christian tradition to be older than the corresponding contemporary Jewish one. (MenTaLguY)
AND
And as far as the use of the LXX by the NT authors – I think that is unassailable. If you take Paul’s letters, for instance, and isolate his OT quotes and compare them to the MT, it is obvious that that is not what Paul was quoting. His quotes are often verbatim what we find in the LXX as you’d find it in a modern edition. Sometimes they are not, but this is due to the complicated history of the LXX text, and the quotations that are not exact are cosistently closer to the LXX than the MT. (Josh)

francis 03 February 9, 2007 at 6:34 pm

We have to be careful not to take a “sola scriptura” attitude towards this. Yes, the Greek was inspired, but Our Lord’s command applied to the original words he spoke as well! If he spoke those words in Aramaic, then I’d say we’re lucky enough to have authoritative versions of the Lord’s Prayer in two languages!

Shane February 9, 2007 at 7:20 pm

Another one of the important factors in the Jewish rejection of the Deuterocanonicals was a Jewish revolt against the Romans in the 130s. It was led by Simon Bar Kokhba, who was considered by many Jews to be the Messiah. Because Christians obviously did not consider this man to be the Messiah, they did not participate in the revolt, which earned them the status of traitors amongst many Jews. After this time, an effort can be found in Jewish circles to exclude those books which supported Christian doctrines.

Realist February 11, 2007 at 3:23 am

An Op-Ed:
From the Faith Futures’ Jesus Database
“In Jesus Before God. The Prayer Life of the Historical Jesus. (Polebridge, 1999), Hal Taussig develops his thesis that the Lord’s Prayer is a collection of several prayer lines that were significant to the early Q community. His discussion of “Forgive us our debts” occurs on pages 89-92 and represents a good example of his argument. He concludes:
Situating this sentence prayer within its social context makes clear that it arose from certain specific situations in which Jesus found himself. It did not, within the lifetime of Jesus, belong to the Lord’s Prayer, which was the product of the generations after Jesus. … after Jesus was gone his followers in Galilee formulated a general prayer in his name, combining fragments from Jesus’ own prayers with other material to create an institutionalized prayer in Jesus’ name. As the various versions of this Lord’s Prayer from the second half of the first century were passed on, the meanings of the individual prayer sentences were generalized and taken out of context. The sentence prayer about forgiveness made a gradual transition from forgiving one another’s debts to forgiveness of sins.”

Fabio P.Barbieri February 11, 2007 at 5:12 am

Shane: as a matter of fact, the hatred of the mainline Jews for the Christians far preceded the Bar Kochba revolt. It is found in the New Testament. The Bar Kochba revolt has in my view a different significance. If I remember my Eusebius correctly, it did not take place in Palestine alone, but all across the Eastern Mediterranean from Cilicia to Cyrenaica. This was the heartland of the Roman Empire – Europe was a secondary part at the time – and the accounts suggest to me that this war represented a genuine Jewish attempt to eviscerate and conquer the Empire. Such an attempt is clearly prophesied in the Dead Sea Scrolls, with descriptions of armies of Jews and angels overthrowing Kittim (Roman) legions in an apocalyptic struggle for power over the whole world. The Dead Sea Scroll view was in effect that the Jews would, at the end of times, rule over the whole world: and Bar Kochba, whose name “Son-of-the-Star” designates him as a Messiah, seems to have made a serious effort to turn these beliefs into reality.
His collapse, then, must have represtented a turning point for the Jews. Traditional Jewish literature as it has come down to our time does not contain anything even remotely similar to the war prophecies of the Dead Sea literature: to the contrary, Jews are enjoined to pray for the peace and prosperity of whatever country they find themselves in. The idea of conquering all the world for God has transmigrated to the Muslims, but it was completely lost in Judaism; and, in this if nothing else, Judaism aligned itself with Christianity, whose leaders had demanded prayers for the Emperor and the magistrates from the beginning of their preaching.

Andii Bowsher February 11, 2007 at 7:15 am

FYI. Some more stuff on the Aramaic Lord’s prayer is at http://www.squidoo.com/abwun/

SouthCoast February 11, 2007 at 6:27 pm

Was the squirrely website translation the same one used in the otherwise marvelous San Antonio Vocal Ensemble setting of the Lord’s Prayer (the English translation given in the liner notes starts out rendering Abwoon as “Father/Mother”!)?

Kasia February 12, 2007 at 7:11 am

As a longtime language geek, all I can say is:
COOOOOOOOOOL!

Docholmes February 12, 2007 at 4:46 pm

I contacted the makers of the Video that Anony-Mouse had listed the URL for and now have it located on my Myspace page. Neat Video.

3rd February 12, 2007 at 9:49 pm

Is this original link? I came across this just recently.
http://www.v-a.com/bible/prayer.html

Anonymous February 13, 2007 at 8:30 am

Thank you for posting this. I heard about it on your podcast, and feel closer to Our Lord by hearing His prayer in the language He spoke. Again, thank you!

Emmanuel March 11, 2007 at 9:21 am

Hey guys…. just wanted to point out a very interesting fact i found out lately, the last and only nation to this day that still actually speaks “Aramaic” the language of Christ are the Assyrians, who consider themselves the direct decendents of the ancient Assyrians.
The only number about 3.3 millino worldwide present day and the Assyrian church of the east which was founded believe it or not by St Thomas the apostle himself is the last remaining church in the world which uses full Aramaic in all its church services and weekly holy mass.
Interesting? well very indeed to me :)
have fun reseraching this topic because its dragged me into it now even more looool and its fun.

Abby March 18, 2007 at 12:43 pm

Dear Jimmy,
I am writing a paper about Avinu Shebashamayim (the Hebrew way of saying Our Father in Heaven) as presented in the Hebrew Chronicles. I am analyzing the different feelings that that saying elicited during the Medieval Period. Thus, I am wondering if you know the original source of the saying. Where it is found in the New Testaments, in the Talmud and any other sources you are aware of that contain that saying. Additionally, where is this Aramaic source from? Which century? Thank you very much!
Sincerely,
Abby

Randolph March 27, 2007 at 8:40 am

Jimmy,
You said in the original post that the translation given on the website that you was “completely wrong” and that the website was “kooky.” Are you an expert in ancient Aramaic? How do you know that the translation was completely wrong? Maybe the translation is correct?
Additionally, why did you consider the website to be “kooky?” Is it because the website had different views than the Catholic church?
As a disenfranchised Catholic who is annoyed with the church on many issues, I am just curious why you chose to not to post the web address. You could have posted it and stated why you disagree with it. Otherwise, it looks like censorship.
R

Thoma July 15, 2007 at 2:41 pm

I learned the Abwun de washmaya several years ago. A part of the historical point, it is wonderful to communicate with heaven in the language of Christ. Im am wondering that no more people speak this prayer in Aramaic language. Not even the priests and the pastors.
Thank you for all the information above.
Rose-Marie Thoma Switzerland 2007-07-15

Jean-Louis December 8, 2007 at 5:17 am

I just read the above posts, and the one by pseudomodo espcially retained my attention. There is a book by Claude Tresmontant whose French title is “Le Christ hébreu” (I don’t know whether it has been translated into English) which has very convincing arguments. According to Tresmontant the Gospels have been written not long after the Crucifixion, certainly before the destruction of the Second Temple, and in Hebrew. For anyone who has some knowledge of Greek and Hebrew it is very impressive.

bernadette December 27, 2007 at 2:17 am

my name is bernadette, i am aramaic my self and
and this is the pure languages of “our father”
and i think that was nicely done

Jiries February 3, 2008 at 7:43 am

I speak western aramaic, I learned it from my Dad. We only speak western aramaic at home. we grew up not allow to speak arabic only aramaic.
What you have up there is assyrian not western aramaic. jesus spoke western aramaic not assyrian . So jesus spoke it in western aramaic and it go like this.
Aboon Dibashmayo not shmaya
Nitkadash shmokh not shmakh
Titeh Malkoto not malkota
Nehweh sibyono
aykano dibashmayo
of waryo hablan
lahmo dssin konan
yawmono wa shbooklan
hawbayen wahto hayen
aykano dof hnan
shbakn l hayo bayen
lo ta lan le nisyoono
eno fasolan
min bisho metool
dilokhey malkoto
haylo tish bohto
olam olmeen ameen.

Luis Gaviria June 15, 2008 at 5:32 pm

Jimmy,
Thank you for inspiring me with such an interesting piece of info.
It makes my faith somehow stronger, coming across those words.
Thank you to the rest of commentators for their insights.
May the Lord bless you all.
Luis Gaviria
http://www.lacomunidad.us

Dr.George Zachariah July 2, 2008 at 4:37 am

Thank you for the wonderful glimpses of our heavenly father’s mother tongue on the earth.HE bless you.

Ben Asher August 2, 2008 at 6:48 pm

Hello,
I recently came across this site and read the blogs concerning the Aramaic ‘version’ of the New Testament. For one that seems to posses some knowledge of history, it is displeasing to see the choice learning. The book of Josephus shows that it was FORBIDDEN by the elders of ancient Israel to learn the language of Greek. Josephus (93 A.D.)Antiquities 20, 21:2 says:
“I have also taken on a great deal of pains to obtain the learning of the Greeks, and to understand the elements of the Greek language, although I have so accustomed myself to speak my own tongue, that I cannot pronounce Greek with sufficient exactness. For our nation does not encourage those that learn the language of many nations. On this account, their have been many who have done their endeavors, with great patience, to obtain Greek leardning, there have hardly been two or three that have succeeded herein, who were immediately rewarded for their pains.”
So, we can get a glimps of what really went on in the first century, and what language was really spoken by ancient Israel. Also, It is true that there exists a re-translation of the Aramaic into Greek (Syriac version), but that doesn’t mean that the other Aramaic scriptures follow suite. The Jacobite Pesshito that is used in the East however, PROVES to be the actual scriptures that THE GREEK WAS TRANSLATED FROM. If a person were to read the Greek translations in its original, they would see that the ‘Koine Greek’ does not follow the rules of Koine Greek. They would also realize that the “original Greek” translates a few phrasse and words from Aramaic. If the Greek were the “original”, why does it refer to another language and translates? Also, one of your visitors asked a question concerning the Hebrew version of the Messiah’s prayer, as well as the Aramaic version. the blog is as follows: Posted by: Emmanuel | Mar 11, 2007 9:21:05 AM
I am writing a paper about Avinu Shebashamayim (the Hebrew way of saying Our Father in Heaven) as presented in the Hebrew Chronicles. I am analyzing the different feelings that that saying elicited during the Medieval Period. Thus, I am wondering if you know the original source of the saying. Where it is found in the New Testaments, in the Talmud and any other sources you are aware of that contain that saying. Additionally, where is this Aramaic source from? Which century? Thank you very much!
Sincerely,
Abby
The answer to the first question: The original (or oldest) Hebrew is said to have been from the “Du-Tillet” Matthew. A good version of the prayer today would be from the Saul Ginsberg New Testament, which is from the Greek into biblical Hebrew. The answer to the second question: The Aramaic is said to have originated in the East coming directly from one of the original Apostles. It is amazing that this scrutiny is focused on the Aramaic, but no one mentions the variuos Greek versions that differ GREATLY from each other, i.e the Byzantine, Vulgate, Textus Receptus, etc. I can go on with this topic, but I’ll just post the proof of the Aramaic original, which also shows the Greek’s short comings. The site is: http://www.peshitta.netfirms.com. Happy readings. ENJOY.

bong October 1, 2008 at 8:54 pm

do you have the aramaic translation of the rosary ?please send it to me for it is a wonderful prayer and very good for the soul.i’m from the philippines and i love to recite it the way Jeus pray in aramaic! thank you so much.

bong October 1, 2008 at 8:56 pm

do you have the aramaic translation of the rosary ?please send it to me for it is a wonderful prayer and very good for the soul.i’m from the philippines and i love to recite it the way Jeus pray in aramaic! thank you so much.

James McDonald November 4, 2008 at 2:37 pm

When I click on the image, a window opens that is entirely black.

James McDonald November 4, 2008 at 2:39 pm

When I click on the image, a window opens that is entirely black.

Lisa November 7, 2008 at 10:50 am

Thank you for this information. I’ve been looking for a while and then boom…I landed on your site. Hearing this prayer in Aramaic touched my soul.

zarei December 21, 2008 at 8:50 am

Hi, I need translation in Arameic like that for Our Father of the verse 22:17 of the Reveleation of John – i found this :
Revelation 22:17 Aramaic NT: Peshitta
ܘܪܘܚܐ ܘܟܠܬܐ ܐܡܪܝܢ ܬܐ ܘܕܫܡܥ ܢܐܡܪ ܬܐ ܘܕܨܗܐ ܢܐܬܐ ܘܢܤܒ ܡܝܐ ܚܝܐ ܡܓܢ ܀
but can not find transliteration – can you send it, Please, I’ll really appreciate it .. Thanks

Brian January 3, 2009 at 3:44 pm

i am a chaldean american that comes from northern iraq and speaks the aramaic (sureth) language my whole life.. please keep in mind that the aramaic language is not spoken only one way it has many dialects that spread from village to village in norther iraq.. every village has a certain difference in the language so the our father isint only said this one way!.. it is very close but has its differences.. i cant write it in aramaic but i can type it how it is pernounced..
Baban deele beshmaya,
payesh mkodsha shimukh, athya malkothokh,
hawe ojbonokh, dikh deele bishmaya hawe ham bara.
Halan lokhman sumqana didyou.
Shwoq talan gnahan wkh-tiyathan,
dikh d-ham akhnee shwiqlan ta
ana dim-tu-dela ellan.
La mab-yeretan bjoraba,
ella mkhalislan min beesha,
bsabab deokh ela malkotha,
hela wtesh-bohta, laalam almeen,
AMEN.
God bless you all!!
and i hope that you understand that the chaldean/assyrian people are only 1,000,000 in this world.. dont forget who we are and what our people have accomplished! thank you!

Brian January 3, 2009 at 4:03 pm

i am a chaldean american that comes from northern iraq and speaks the aramaic (sureth) language my whole life.. please keep in mind that the aramaic language is not spoken only one way it has many dialects that spread from village to village in norther iraq.. every village has a certain difference in the language so the our father isint only said this one way!.. it is very close but has its differences.. i cant write it in aramaic but i can type it how it is pernounced..
Baban deele beshmaya,
payesh mkodsha shimukh, athya malkothokh,
hawe ojbonokh, dikh deele bishmaya hawe ham bara.
Halan lokhman sumqana didyou.
Shwoq talan gnahan wkh-tiyathan,
dikh d-ham akhnee shwiqlan ta
ana dim-tu-dela ellan.
La mab-yeretan bjoraba,
ella mkhalislan min beesha,
bsabab deokh ela malkotha,
hela wtesh-bohta, laalam almeen,
AMEN.
God bless you all!!
and i hope that you understand that the chaldean/assyrian people are only 1,000,000 in this world.. dont forget who we are and what our people have accomplished! thank you!

Brian January 3, 2009 at 4:09 pm

This is the hail mary in Chaldean aramaic
Shlama Illakh Maryam,
mleetha na’ami,
maran imakh,
mburakhta b-inshe,
mbourkhaila pera d-kasakh Isho’.
Mart maryam, yema d-alaha,
msale mbadalan akhnee hattaye,
min daha wid-shetha dmothan,
AMEN.
Hail Mary full of grase the lord is with thee blessid are thow amongst women and blessid is the fruit of thy womb Jesus Holy Mary Mother of God pray for our sinners now and the hour of our death AMEN.

jonk January 13, 2009 at 1:03 pm

Hi, Brian – do you happen to have sound file of the Hail Mary in Aramaic? I have no knowledge of Aramaic pronounciation, so even phonetically it’s difficult. I was only able to learn the Lord’s prayer by listening to it many times while reading the phonetic pronounciation. So far I’ve been unable to locate an audio file for the Hail Mary, though.
Thanks!!

World Prayer February 16, 2009 at 1:26 pm

Wow…love the Lords Prayer….very cool!! Blessings ;-)

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