A Pope for the Internet Age?

by Jimmy Akin

in Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict’s trip to the United States is obviously a focus of attention right now.

I’d like to CHT the reader who e-mailed a link to THIS STORY by Peggy Noonan.

In it, she reflects on the personal styles of JP2 and B16, and offers a number of insights, among them this:

A Vatican reporter last week said John Paul was the perfect pope for the television age, "a man of images." Think of the pictures of him storm-tossed, tempest-tossed, standing somewhere and leaning into a heavy wind, his robes whipping behind him, holding on to his crosier, the staff bearing the image of a crucified Christ, with both hands, for dear life, as if consciously giving Christians a picture of what it is to be alive.

Benedict, the reporter noted, is the perfect pope for the Internet age. He is a man of the word. You download the text of what he said, print it, ponder it.

Actually, I don’t print it. I have my text-to-speech engine read it to me and then ponder it, but I get the idea.

Now if the Holy See would only get the perfect web site for the Internet age.

Unfortunately, not everyone is as appreciative of B16 as Mrs. Noonan.

Stephen Prothero, the Chair of the Department of Religion for Jesuit-run Boston College, for example, ISN’T:

Young American Catholics treated John Paul II like a rock star. Yes, he was socially and theologically conservative, but at least they could relate to the guy with the "Popemobile" and the smile and the energy to travel to some 130 countries during his 26 years at the Holy See. But can they relate to Benedict XVI? And can he relate to them? What can a pope who is an academic theologian first and foremost offer young Americans, save for dogmas they don’t believe in and rituals they do not understand? Is he coming to scold us? Or to hug us?

We are about to find out.

Actually, someone should scold Stephen Prothero, but it should be someone other than B16.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, there’s LOTS OF COVERAGE OF THE PAPAL VISIT FROM EWTN.

If you liked this post, you should join Jimmy's Secret Information Club to get more great info!


What is the Secret Information Club?I value your email privacy

{ 57 comments }

David B. April 16, 2008 at 8:08 am

What can a pope who is an academic theologian first and foremost offer young Americans, save for dogmas they don’t believe in and rituals they do not understand?
Stephen Prothero, I can answer me for myself: I believe in the Teachings of the Church, and I understand and cherish Tradition. From this young person to an old(er) person, please shut up and stop speaking for me. Thank you.

bill912 April 16, 2008 at 8:17 am

Do you get the impression that Prothero was engaging in projection about dogmas he doesn’t believe in and rituals he doesn’t understand?

David B. April 16, 2008 at 8:24 am

Who are the blind guides (unfortunate, but true) who hired this Anti-Catholic hack to head the ‘religion’ department? When last I looked, people went to ‘Catholic’ colleges because they are/were Catholic colleges.
It seems counter-intuitive for a ‘Catholic” college to be discouraging Catholics from understanding and believing in their Faith. It kinda discourages people from paying for an education from their school, doesn’t it?

Tim J April 16, 2008 at 8:38 am

“Is he coming to scold us? Or to hug us?”
If he’s a good Father, probably both.

Terence M. Stanton April 16, 2008 at 8:51 am

A.M.D.G.
If you want to send your kid to a Catholic school that actually teaches Catholicism, then you ought to look at one of these: Christendom College, The College of Saint Thomas More, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Magdalen College, Thomas Aquinas College, The Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, University of Dallas, the University of St. Thomas (Houston, Tex.), Ave Maria University, Holy Apostles College & Seminary, John Paul the Great Catholic University; Our Lady Seat of Wisdom Academy, Southern Catholic College, Wyoming Catholic College, Aquinas College (Nashville, Tenn.), Belmont Abbey College, Benedictine College, The Catholic University of America, DeSales University, Mount St. Mary’s University or St. Gregory’s University.

AnnonyMouse April 16, 2008 at 9:28 am

If they don’t understand the rituals then why can’t we go back to Latin!!!!!
Ok Mr. Aikin, HOW do I get the text to speech software you are talking about?
I would love to read more of the Holy Father’s writing but there comes a point when my eyes weary because of the stress of the computer and such.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 10:16 am

I’ve got really mixed feelings and sentiments by the first article, and simple loathing for the second. I’m sure Peggy Noonan and a great number other Catholics look back with a whistful nostalgia for the papacy of JP II, as they do with buying their first car or house. But she and other Catholics need to get with the program. She and many other liberals like her are doing EXACTLY what they accuse others of doing: Living in the past. If the church is indeed going “back to the future” then she should embrace it and embrace our current Pope for who he is and what he is doing, without constantly insinuating “yeah…but he’s no JP”.
As for the second article, my disgust cannot by adequately summarized here. So, I will simply offer it up and close with an uplifting GOD BLESS POPE BENEDICT!!!!!

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 10:42 am

And at the risk of looking like I’m some nut with too much time on my hands, I think it is all our interests to write Boston University and tell them their Chair of the Department of Religion is expressing a blatantly biased anti-Catholic sentiment in his comments, such as:
1. the only role Benedict XVI seems comfortable playing is the geek.
2. Benedict XVI seems to greet our age with a sneer.
3. But the big question is who precisely will show up at these gatherings. Will it be God’s Rottweiler? Or will it be God’s Poodle…(both refering to our Pope)
We should remind the Dean and Mr Prothero that regardless of his particular “opinions”, by the title of his chair he is representing Boston University when speaking publically. And in this particular case has given the impression that Boston University is anti-Catholic, anti-papal and without sensitivity. And at least in MY case, will never receive a dime of support or endorsement.
If anyone here should feel obliged to write the school, here are the appropriate individuals:
Stephen Prothero: prothero@bu.edu
Kenneth Elmore, Dean of Students kennmore@bu.edu
Daryl DeLuca, Assitant Dean djdeluca@bu.edu

Sodbuster April 16, 2008 at 11:04 am

Law AND Gospel, Stephen Prothero, Law AND Gospel.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 11:34 am

Here are the two emails I just sent (Yes, I DID mention to you all that I am a member of Amnesty International and other human rights causes, so don’t say you were never warned : )
To prothero@bu.edu
I am extremely appalled and offended at your insensitive anti-Catholic comments in the USA Today website http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/04/what-can-we-exp.html Specifically, you refer to our beloved Pope Benedict XVI as:
1. the only role Benedict XVI seems comfortable playing is the geek.
2. Benedict XVI seems to greet our age with a sneer.
3. But the big question is who precisely will show up at these gatherings. Will it be God’s Rottweiler? Or will it be God’s Poodle…(both referring to our Pope)
You exemplify the current parasitic genre of writing, codified by the likes of Christopher Hitchins, which seeks to defame and leach off of individuals who are far greater and have accomplished far more than yourself and at the same time offend as many people as possible in the process in order to generate some “buzz” which has been thus far unobtainable in your case. Regardless of your supposed credentials, it is obvious by your writing and tone that this is simply a very weak attempt to seek attention and garner some credibility on subject matter which your previous writings and accomplishments (or lack thereof) have not afforded you.
To the Dean(s): (title: University Donations)
Hello,
I am extremely appalled and offended at the insensitive anti-Catholic comments which the Chair of your Religion Department, Stephen Prothero, made on the USA Today website http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/04/what-can-we-exp.html Specifically, he refers to our beloved Pope Benedict XVI as:
1. the only role Benedict XVI seems comfortable playing is the geek.
2. Benedict XVI seems to greet our age with a sneer.
3. But the big question is who precisely will show up at these gatherings. Will it be God’s Rottweiler? Or will it be God’s Poodle…(both referring to our Pope)
Since Mr. Prothero chooses to include his position at Boston University at the end of his biased and unscrupulous rant, it must be concluded that Boston University shares his sentiments as well. In which case, your institution will receive neither endorsement nor support from myself, my place of work, or anyone else who shares these misgivings and disgust with Mr. Prothero’s bigoted commentary.
Sincerely,

Rich M April 16, 2008 at 11:34 am

For what it’s worth, I’m in my mid-twenties and I believe in all the Dogmas (and other Teachings) of the Church and while I’m sure the Mass is beyond the realm of total comprehension this side of heaven, I think I understand what’s going on pretty well. The funny thing is, I’m about to meet with 15-20 other people my age that feel likewise. We love the Holy Father and what He stands for.
We all kinda wish academic “intellectuals” like Steven Prothero would let us speak for ourselves rather than tell others how much we don’t understand or don’t care. Thanks for the email addresses, Deusdonat. I actually might send him a polite email asking him to stop misrepresenting the Catholic youth in the US, although I doubt it’d shut him up.

Sleeping Beastly April 16, 2008 at 11:39 am

David B- I second your comment.
Deusdonat- Noonan’s article doesn’t seem to be disparaging of Papa Benny in any way. I actually agree with her. JPII was exactly what was needed in the 80s and 90s, and BXVI is exactly what we need right now. I was apprehensive when he was first elected, thinking How can he measure up to his predecessor? but he’s won me over 100%, and I thank God for giving us such an awesome shepherd, full of wisdom, love, and humility.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 11:50 am

Sleeping, all I can say is I echo your sentiments completely. May God forgive me, a humble servant, for any previous apprehensions I had or expressed towards our beloved Pope Benedict.

Ed April 16, 2008 at 1:42 pm

I attended a bachelor’s program through St. Gregory’s and my local diocese. I had only one teacher at SGU, but I wouldn’t recommend her (degree from ND in hand)to someone seeking orthodox teachings. That says nothing, however, for the other 99% of the University, which I never experienced.
I’m a member of the generation, by the way, that the Boston College fellow is speaking about. Frankly, I’m tired of the finger-pointing and the fighting. I figure Jesus is God incarnate and was serious about protecting the Church from error in her teachings or he was a man (only) and a liar. Very CS Lewis, I suppose, but I see no other way about it. “Who do you say I am?,” He asks. “You are the Christ; to whom else could I go for eternal life?” I respond.
God bless His Church, protect her, and guide her; and God bless His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI, guardian of the Church, conscience of the world.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 2:00 pm

Ed well put. I went to a Jesuit University in Northern California, which was ironically very “conservative” among the Universities around here (Berkeley is an hour away) but extremely liberal and unorthodox for ANY Catholic institution. There was a Jewish Student Union, a Muslim Student Union, a Homosexual student Union, a blanket “Christian Club” which mixed all Christian faiths together. All the history and 2/4ths of the Political Science professors were Jewish. Religon courses consisted of “Liberation Theology” and “Real Time Christianity” with professors who made statements like “who cares if Mary fooled around?” to the utter bemusement and enjoyment of the students who thought they were “cool” for daring to say that.
I’m grateful for the doors that were opened to me by attending this University. But I seriously look back at that “education” with resentment and contempt, since it was far from Catholic.

Foxfier April 16, 2008 at 3:00 pm

Well…I relate to him just fine because I’m a geek(general), and he’s a geek(The Church).
He’s passionate and detailed in his geekdom, able to take words and weave them into a picture, then take many pictures and find out how they’re related, or could be related, and how the warp and weft works, and oh LOOK at this neat bit!
That’s what geeks DO. Look at the evil overlord lists, the “who would win, batman or superman” and the vast amounts of research that goes into most Dungeons and Dragons groups; I think that his approach will attract that sort, just as JPII attracted those who respond best to his appearance and voice.
He has a passion, and he’s brilliant about that passion. Alright, so he’s not a “rockstar,” and I’ve read several folks mentioning that he seems a little bit shy. I’d say his biggest flaw is that he expects everyone else to be willing to think; a very geekish flaw.
I think he may create more Catholic geeks, and that’s all to the good.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 3:17 pm

LOL. Preach it mah brutha! Let’s take back the word “geek” like queer, nigga and wop. But let’s not use it in the context of the Holy Father. As far as I’m concerned, there are some things which should remain sacred, regardless of the trends and our tendencies to the contrary.
Woe be to you scribes, and pharises Americaths, for ye are like unto painted tombs which appear beautiful outwards: but are within full of dead men’s bones and of all filthiness.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 3:29 pm

I’m sorry for bogarting this thread, but I just came across a quote from Pope Benedict’s visit which evokes so many emotions in me that I’ve found it hard to concentrate today as I’ve been thinking about it so much.
“The preservation of freedom calls for the cultivation of virtue, self-discipline, sacrifice for the common good and a sense of responsibility towards the less fortunate. It also demands the courage to engage in civic life and to bring one’s deepest beliefs and values to reasoned public debate.”
My God. Am I the only one at a loss here?

Foxfier April 16, 2008 at 4:28 pm

Deusdonat – feel free to not refer to him as that, then; I will continue to consider him a geek, one of my own in a way, and I will use that to try to bring people to the Church. (Geeks are a rich possible source of, at the very least, lay versions of Ratzinger–yet they are generally turned away by mostly well-meaning people who refuse to THINK.)
He is quite surely not only able to “play” that he’s a geek– the implication that he’s both incompetent and fake is rather insulting. An organization like BU should be brighter than that.
Yet we are not “taking back” the word. None of the geeks I know– in person, roughly 40– consider being a geek a *bad* thing. Consider the source of an attempted insult; in this case, it is from children who do not value intellect and its fruits. Comparing it to the slurs you referred to is giving some very foolish children a lot more power than even the other children allow. The root slang may be from a carnival act, but–much like “gay” or “Otaku”– the meaning changed.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 5:02 pm

Foxfier I guess we have two different meanings of the word going then. Normally, I wouldn’t point anyone towards Wikipedia, but I think it’s as relevant as any to this discussion, since the nuance of the word is where we disagree. And Wikipedia is arguably one of the most populist resources we have in our age. Anyway, it says:
“a peculiar or otherwise odd person, especially one who is perceived to be overly obsessed with one or more things including those of intellectuality, electronics, gaming, etc”
I did read the entire article, specifically “definitions” and “reclaiming and self-identification”. I understand you are using it as self-identification and a term of endearment. But the term to me has always had an inadeptness and lacking of social grace aspect to it (not simply the “smart” or intellectual person you are making it out to be…that would be a nerd : ).
Anyway, thank you SO much for allowing me not to refer to him as that then. I was so worried I didn’t have your permission here. And I hope I have your permission to continue to hold our Pope and his holy office with respect and dignity as well. Oh, and can I also “feel free” not to refer to Mother Teresa as a wench? And I’d really like to feel free not to refer to Jesus as a “dude”/”nerd”/”mo-fo”/”nigga” etc (all of which I have been either called or self-identified as well by the way).
I really find this odd. I mean seriously, would anyone find it anything other than disgraceful to call the Pope a “geek” 30+ years ago?

Foxfier April 16, 2008 at 7:11 pm

I avoid wiki unless I’m using it as a jump-off point for good information.
Try geek.com, then imagine it was about religion, instead of technology: THAT is what B16 may foster.
I really find this odd. I mean seriously, would anyone find it anything other than disgraceful to call the Pope a “geek” 30+ years ago?
Would anyone find it offensive to call someone gay some 30+ years ago?
Would I be offended to be called a liberal in the ’50s?
How about Negro, which be became Black, which became African descent or “African American”? Given your seeming obsession with slang referring to that group of people.
I would also like to see an example of someone outside of LARP or SCA calling a woman “wench” as a complement.
Going to ignore your snark and wait for an intelligent answer– you’ve shown you’re capable of it. Might even manage to show your manners again.
By the way, why didn’t you just go to dictionary.com?
Their definition:
1. a peculiar or otherwise dislikable person, esp. one who is perceived to be overly intellectual.
2. a computer expert or enthusiast (a term of pride as self-reference, but often considered offensive when used by outsiders.)
Peculiar:
1: characteristic of only one person, group, or thing : distinctive
2: different from the usual or normal

What is more dislikable than someone telling you that you must move against your desires, to be in agreement with God? What is more unusual than a shy man standing up against Nazis, running away at risk of his life, becoming a priest, then a well loved bishop, then the POPE? How common do you think the mind that created so MANY solid books might be?
I will also let you know that there is a large subgroup that *is* horrified at the “anti-Christ” coming to the USA– and even more horrified that the President, when greeting him, mentioned that it was the first visit since B16′s elevation to the seat of Peter.

Minnie April 16, 2008 at 8:00 pm

Would anyone find it offensive to call someone gay some 30+ years ago?
The meaning of “gay” hasn’t changed much since then, although the attitude towards homosexual persons may have. Perhaps you’re thinking of “queer.” There was some effort to take that word back, as they say, but strong negative connotation remains in common context. As does the negative connotation of “geek.”
What is more dislikable than someone telling you that you must move against your desires, to be in agreement with God?
So your “geek” is a dislikable person, making “geek” a dislikable name to be called. If you want to be generally disliked, be a geek.

Deusdonat April 16, 2008 at 9:48 pm

MINNIE So your “geek” is a dislikable person, making “geek” a dislikable name to be called. If you want to be generally disliked, be a geek.
LOL : )
FOXFIER Would anyone find it offensive to call someone gay some 30+ years ago?
You missed the point entirely. I was not referring to the change in word meanings. I was talking about the “relaxed” counter-culture attitudes about respect and authority. My point is, 30 + years ago, would it have been seen as anything other than disrespect to refer to the Pope with some word having a known derrogatory meaning? This is rhetorical, as the answer is “yes”. So, what makes it OK now?
You are saying that your referring to the Pope as a “geek” is just fine, even though it has negative connotations which you supported with the dictionary.com definition. FYI, I didn’t use the dictionary.com definition myself, as I thought you might retort by saying, “that’s out of touch with the modern version/usage of the word.” So, I turned to Hoi Polloi of Wikipedia. Either way, both wikipedia and dictionary.com are saying the same thing. It is a “cute”, familiar term with negative connotations that have been embraced by those who self-identify with it.
As for the “snark”, it was to hold a mirror to your sentiment. I don’t like dismissive arguments. When you say, “feel free to…” (or as I call it “feel free to “x” yourself”) what you are doing is dismissing the argument from the other side with the premise that you will do what you want anyway. If that is the case, then why engage in conversation? I know I am “free” to do or say what I want within reason. You don’t need to tell me that. Or anyone. Unless someone is unaware that they are living in a society dedicated to freedom of expression, that fact is pretty much self-evident and doesn’t add to the discussion. It dismisses it. Does that make sense?

Randy April 16, 2008 at 9:51 pm

Does your text-to-speech engine get the accent right?

Randy April 16, 2008 at 9:51 pm

Does your text-to-speech engine get the accent right?

Andrea April 17, 2008 at 6:19 am

Here is an article along the same lines as Stephen Prothero’s. The writer’s viewpoint is less surprising since she is a senior editor at Newsweek. However, it is still just as biased and ignorant. http://www.newsweek.com/id/131837?GT1=43002

Catholic April 17, 2008 at 6:36 am

Thanks for your Blog :) God Bless you

Eric April 17, 2008 at 7:21 am

I am watching the mass on tv…Why does the Pope wear that colorful outfit? Almost resembles a clown suit. The whole spectacle is foreign and strange…I cant believe people buy into this stuff!

Sleeping Beastly April 17, 2008 at 8:21 am

Deusdonat- I generally like your posts and style, and I bet that if we’d had a class together in college or worked together we’d be buds. So it’s with nothing but affection that I say I think you might want to consider switching to decaf.

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 9:05 am

Sleeping I drink chai. So, not to “rebuff your stated affections” but I’m affraid there’s no getting around the caffein.
Back to the topic, did anyone catch the quote I posted from the Pope from yesterday’s White House visit?:
“The preservation of freedom calls for the cultivation of virtue, self-discipline, sacrifice for the common good and a sense of responsibility towards the less fortunate. It also demands the courage to engage in civic life and to bring one’s deepest beliefs and values to reasoned public debate.”
Any comments here?

David B. April 17, 2008 at 9:18 am

I am watching the mass on tv…Why does the Pope wear that colorful outfit? Almost resembles a clown suit.
As opposed to being a clown, as you are when you pretend that the pope is clownish or irrelevant. You obviously thought it important enough to make yourself look like a fool by leaving disrespectful comments on a Catholic blog.
The whole spectacle is foreign and strange
Foreign, maybe,(it is happening here, and it is being ‘run’ by America Bishops) strange, no. It makes one appear ignorant to call whatever one is unfamiliar with “strange.”
I cant (sic) believe people buy into this stuff!
If you don’t, you are in a very small minority. Apparently you can, however, since you find it necessary to post disrespectful comments about it on this blog. Why waste your time on what you say you can’t (actually, “won’t” is truer) believe? I don’t waste my time mocking the Easter Bunny or Scientology. The truth is that you have more regard for Catholicism than you’ll admit.

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 9:26 am

Hmm…I actually thought Eric’s post was hyperbole and satire against the writers of the article in question (i.e. the Pope being “out of touch”). I didn’t take it seriously.

Skgyor April 17, 2008 at 9:35 am

Back to the topic, did anyone catch the quote I posted from the Pope from yesterday’s White House visit?

I was waiting as well–I’m a bit shy here–so I guess I’ll bite.
Seems he just said more eloquently as it always has been said “with freedom comes responsibility” or as I prefer “obligation”. It follows what I’m picking up as an underlying message/theme is that “USA has lots of freedom etc.” now use it for Catholicism. Strive and continue to be Christocentric and bring that into social/public life, instead of flouting individual understanding and relationships.
I could be wrong since he is saying so much that I’m slightly annoyed that I don’t have the transcripts yet to pour over them.
(Also if anyone knows a good Spanish translations for them, or where they will be, I’d highly appreciate it.)

David B. April 17, 2008 at 9:36 am

Well, I don’t know. I could see how the first parts sarcasm could be construed as a joke, but the line “I cant believe people buy into this stuff!” follows the template of other anti-Catholics who have posted here, and seems too straightforward to be a joke… HOWEVER, (big however) if he meant it as a joke, well, then I take be 100% of what I said, apologize, and will ask first next time, just to be sure. No offense to him if that’s the case. I’d never ball out anyone who’s making a good-natured joke.

David B. April 17, 2008 at 9:39 am

I meant to say” I could see how the first part could be construed as a sarcastic joke”

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 9:52 am

Skygor, puedes verla aquí La libertad, un don y una responsabilidad, explica el Papa a Estados Unidos.
Zenit es multilingüe y probablemente la noticia más reconocida en el mundo católico.
DAVID, I wouldn’d loose sleep over it either way. It was a provocative post. It just provoked humor in me and indignance in you. Both reactions are valid, so don’t worry too much about it.

Smoky Mountain April 17, 2008 at 11:17 am

I’ve actually been pleasantly surprised by the MSM coverage of the Papal visit; the majority of articles I’ve read have struck me as either positive or at least neutral.

The Sojourner April 17, 2008 at 11:38 am

What can a pope who is an academic theologian first and foremost offer young Americans, save for dogmas they don’t believe in and rituals they do not understand?
Umm…how about dogmas they embrace and rituals that speak to their souls?
As a young Catholic I find it irksome that people characterize my generation as unable to relate to one of the greatest, if not the greatest, intellectual minds of the 20th & 21st centuries.
As an aside, I’d love to get into the discussion of what “Catholic geek” connotes (I consider it a compliment), but my boyfriend explains it better than I do and he’s on blog break right now.

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 11:59 am

I guess maybe the whole point of “geekergate” here is that we should choose our words wisely, as they may have a close and familiar meaning to some and look derrogatory to others. If I, as a Catholic say I am offended by some moron calling the Pope a geek in a national publication, then that is a perfectly valid sentiment, just as is someone who calls her closest friends geeks finding it to be endearing. So, people writing articles about religious figures should refrain from using words which will in ALL probability be construed as derrogatory to some, unless this is their direct intent. From the tone and verbage in the article in question, that seems to be precisely the case.
When I call certain people Mohammedans or refer to Mohammed as a “so-called prophet”, I know exactly what I am saying and so do the readers of my sentence.

David B. April 17, 2008 at 12:34 pm

I hear ya, Deusdonat.

Studdunker's Wife April 17, 2008 at 12:35 pm

FYI: Stephen Prothero IS the chair of the department of religion at Boston University NOT Boston College. BU is an independant nonsectarian university, Boston College is the Jesuit run Catholic College.
So while his statements are “non-appreciative” and downright disrepectful of Pope Benedict 16, at the very least he is NOT representing the Catholic college.

David B. April 17, 2008 at 12:37 pm

at the very least he is NOT representing the Catholic college.
Thank God!

Foxfier April 17, 2008 at 1:50 pm

…Geekgate?
Dang, man, switch of chai and try some water.

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 1:56 pm

LOL! I don’t think so. I had my fill of water during Lent. I’ve earned my Chai. And I’m not the one continuing with the ad hominems here. So, maybe some chai might do YOU some good here : )

Thomas April 17, 2008 at 4:56 pm

What can a pope who is an academic theologian first and foremost offer young Americans, save for dogmas they don’t believe in and rituals they do not understand?
The academic, theological reasons for why they should believe in those dogmas, and why and how to understand and appreciate those rituals.
I am a 24 year old American. Four years ago I was a devout (and anti-Catholic) Protestant. The works of academic theologians contributed heavily to my conversion to Catholcism. I accept everything the Catholic Church teaches (especially the dogmas) as revealed by God. I love the sacraments, traditions, and other rituals of the Church.
I join in with the other young voices in this comments box: let the young speak for themselvees, and not some middle-aged quack who thinks he knows what young people think today when actually he stopped thinking when he was young in the 1970′s.
Recent polls have concluded that amongst Catholics that attend Mass at least once a month (which is itself far too rarely), the young tend to hold conservative views most similar to the elderly!

Deusdonat April 17, 2008 at 5:20 pm

Thomas, welcome, and WELCOME : ) Honestly, I don’t know if it is Jimmy’s following or simply the nature of this blog, but I don’t think I’ve ever come across so many converts to Catholicism. I know this is now off-topic, but when I hear about converts like you, I immediately get filled with several very strong emotions: the first and strongest is one of happiness that God has brought you to us. Yet on the same token, there is a lesser feeling of saddness knowing there are SO MANY lost souls who truly think of themselves as Christians, and yet due to the works of Satan have been for countless generations turned against the true church, and will most likely never know it during their lifetimes. Then there is a strong sense of gratitude and unworthiness that by the grace of God I was born into the church.
It’s the old glass is half-full/half-empty thing I guess. But from one Catholic to another, I will tell you something you undoubtedly already know now: You are the light of the world. You carry the faith given to you directly from God while He walked this earth, and for which millions upon millions have died for, so that we could practice this faith today. We are so unworthy, yet we are the most worthy.

Deusdonat April 18, 2008 at 9:53 am

Following on from the “anti-pope” rants we already mentioned, did anyone catch this Grade-A Be-yotch, Ada Calhoun? I’d never heard of her before, but apparently she’s aspiring towards being the poor man’s Ann Coulter. Read with caution.

labrialumn April 19, 2008 at 5:00 pm

Eric,
If you think that the traditional Papal regalia are strange, you should see what the Archflamingo of what used to be the Episcopal church wears. She of the oven mitt and lederhosen.

defensor April 20, 2008 at 5:42 pm

John Paul II’s performance was less than stellar. Not to mention some of the liberal bishops that he chose. All that charismatic nonsense, I wasn’t buying it. B16 seems to be headed in the right direction though.

the warrior April 20, 2008 at 5:44 pm

defensor it’s enough!

Deusdonat April 21, 2008 at 12:11 am

Defensor/Warrior appear to be suffering from a bout of schizophrenia…

Padre Steve April 24, 2008 at 9:09 am

I think both John Paul II and Benedict XVI have been excellent. We have been and are blessed with holy leaders. Benedict showed his own personal rootedness in Christ by the way he approached his visit to the USA. He has the wisdom and the compassion of a saint! God bless him with many more fruitful years of service! God bless! Padre Steve, SDB

Deusdonat April 24, 2008 at 10:55 am

Hello Father Steve! I went to your blog and was astounded and amazed at your pictures and coverage of the visit! Excellent job! I almost wish I were an East-Coaster (almost : P ) so that I could have been there. Best of luck and keep up the good work.

Matthew April 24, 2008 at 8:50 pm

“At Synagogue Pope Tells Two Lies in Two Paragraphs”
(A theologian of Ratzinger’s reknown, with the whole of the Vatican archives at his disposal, can be without excuse.)
Read about them, here:
http://revisionistreview.blogspot.com/2008/04/at-synagogue-pope-tells-two-lies-in-two.html

Deusdonat April 25, 2008 at 7:26 am

LOL. You are a crackpot.

David B. April 25, 2008 at 7:54 pm

Matt,
Walk a mile in his in shoes before you attack based on ONE alleged incident.
Speak the truth, with Love.

SDG April 26, 2008 at 4:50 am

Matthew: The liar is the author of that scandalous, libelous — not to mention (as Deusdonat suggested) transparently silly — blog post.
In disseminating it, you share in his sin.

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